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How Many Young Women Live with Their Parents?

Society | December 05, 2015
Excel Sheet

Some kids simply won't go away! In the U.S., grown adult children living at home with their parents well into their 20’s, 30’s and 40’s are typically called “Millennials” or “boomerang kids”, while the Italians call them "mammon", or "mama's boys". The Japanese call them "parasaito shinguru", or "parasite singles". In the U.K. they are called "KIPPERS", which is short for "kids in parents' pockets eroding retirement savings". 

Problem is, they’re not kids, but full grown adults fully capable of working and taking care of themselves and living on their own.

U.S. census data for the year 2011 showed that almost 20% of Americans between the ages of 25 to 34 were living with their parents. For those aged 18 to 24, the number is 59% of men and 50% of women.

According to the Eurostat, young people were not inclined to leave the parental home until the age of 27 for men and 25 for women in the EU28. In Croatia, Slovakia, Malta and Italy, the mean age of leaving the parental home was 30 or above in 2013. By contrast, young people in Sweden, Denmark and Finland left the parental home, on average, before the age of 23.

How do you kick grown adult children out of the house when they refuse to find work, keep a job, pay their own bills/rent, constantly ask for money? 

Close your wallet and put up a handmade sign over “their” bedroom door saying the bank of mom and dad is hereby closed for business, effective immediately.